recipes

Coleslaw that has been pickled

Coleslaw that has been pickled

I said the other day that I was going to make pickled cabbage, so I made some yesterday. When I say "y'all" that something is great, I really mean "over the moon great." This morning, Zaylee and I went to the market to get cabbage so I could make more today. In an hour, it will be ready to can here. I made yesterday's pickled coleslaw with the last cabbage from our yard. There was a pint of brine left over, so I am also trying the refrigerator way for a couple of half pints. If the fridge way works, I'll know in about a week. If it does, I'll keep this in the fridge all the time and be happy to know I also have some that won't go bad. This will taste great on bbq sandwiches, hotdogs, fish tacos, burgers, and even right out of the jar.
I have to give credit where credit is due. I found "The 1870's Homestead" on Facebook when I was looking for canning ideas a few months ago. When I saw that she made pickled coleslaw, I knew I had to try it. She puts red cabbage and peppers in hers, but I kept mine simple with just cabbage and carrots. My grandparents made chow chow and relish with cabbage. This is nothing like what they made, but I think they would love it just as much as I do. Last night, I really thought about opening a jar to eat as a snack. You're supposed to wait a few weeks before opening, but I'm not sure I can wait that long. That's why I'm hoping the fridge way works.

Coleslaw with pickles (makes 3 pints)

  • 1 big cabbage head
  • 2 T. pickle salt
  • 2 carrots cut into thin strips
  • 2 C. water
  • 2 1/2 c. of white vinegar
  • 2/3 of a cup of white sugar
  • The seeds of celery

Method

  1. Wash the cabbage, then cut it in half and take the center out.
  2. Shred the cabbage into small pieces and put them in a bowl. Salt the cabbage and rub it in with your hands. Wrap it up and put it in the refrigerator for 2 hours.
  3. Rinse well with cold water and then empty. Add to the carrot strips.
  4. Bring the water, vinegar, and sugar to a boil in a pot.
  5. Make sure the sugar is gone by whisking, and then turn off the heat.
  6. Add the cabbage and carrots to the pot, turn off the heat, and let them sit for 1 minute.
  7. Have jars with clean lids and bands and that have been washed ready.
  8. Fill each jar with vegetables and salt to within 1/2 inch of the top.
  9. Into each jar, put a pinch of celery seeds.
  10. Wipe the edges with a vinegar-soaked paper towel, and then put on the lids and bands.
  11. Get your water bath canner hot, and then put the jars in it.
  12. Set a timer for 15 minutes once the canner is at a rolling boil.
  13. Once the jars are done, take the lids off and let them sit for 5 minutes.
  14. Then, place them on a towel-covered table to cool.
  15. Once the jars are cool and sealed, take off the bands and put them somewhere cool and dark.
  16. At least two weeks should pass before you open.
  17. Once it's been opened, it can stay in the fridge for up to a month.

4 Comments

  1. In step 13 you say “take the lids off”. Do you mean to take the lid off the canned? Surely you don’t mean to take the kids off the jars. Please explain. Can’t wait to make this, but I always read over a recipe to get a general idea of where I’m headed before I start. —Thanks!

  2. Typo errors on my previous comment—sorry:

    In step 13 you say “take the lids off”. Do you mean to take the lid off the canner? Surely you don’t mean to take the lids off the jars. Please explain. Can’t wait to make this, but I always read over a recipe to get a general idea of where I’m headed before I start. —Thanks!

  3. Typo errors on my previous comment—sorry for the duplication, but I want my question to be clear.

    In step 13 you say “take the lids off”. Do you mean to take the lid off the canner?

    Surely you don’t mean to take the lids off the jars. Please explain.

    Can’t wait to make this, but I always read over a recipe to get a general idea of where I’m headed before I start.

    —Thanks!

    1. In step 13, when I mentioned "take the lids off," I was referring to removing the lids from the canner, not from the jars. I apologize for any confusion. Here's a clarification:

      After processing the jars in the water bath canner for 15 minutes (step 12), you should indeed remove the jars from the canner, but you should not take the lids off the jars at this point. The lids should remain tightly sealed on the jars to create an airtight seal.

      So, to clarify step 13: Once the jars are done processing in the water bath canner, you can carefully remove them from the canner using jar lifters or a canning rack. Place the jars on a towel-covered table or a cooling rack and allow them to cool undisturbed for about 5 minutes. During this cooling period, you may hear the lids make a popping or sealing sound as they create a vacuum seal.

      After this cooling period, you can leave the lids on the jars and store them in a cool, dark place for at least two weeks before opening. When you're ready to enjoy the pickled coleslaw, you can remove the lid from the jar and serve.

      I hope this clarification helps, and I'm glad to hear you're excited to make the recipe! If you have any more questions or need further assistance, feel free to ask.

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